VIDEO: Local quilters keep tradition, hope alive


By Beanie Taylor - [email protected]



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Sharon Bledsoe, Tonya Edwards and Angela Allen of Home Instead of Mount Airy accept five quilts for their Be A Santa For A Senior program.


Photo courtesty of Vicki Whelan

The Foothills Quilters gather to present quilts and blankets to representatives form The Ark, Your Father's House and I Support My Community each holiday season.


Beanie Taylor | The News

Four different groups were served with 52 blankets and quilts from the Foothills Quilters.


Beanie Taylor | The News

John Creason of Your Father’s House, Crystal Best of I Support My Community and The ARK’s Cynthia Cothren and Betty Holthouser accept quilts and blankets from the Foothills Quilters during the holiday season.


Beanie Taylor | The News

Quilts displayed during the Foothills Quilters Quilt Show the fourth Saturday of September exhibit local history in the materials used as well as the people who created them.


Beanie Taylor | The News

The Reeves quilt was a special project to help raise money for the rehabilitation of the building and expected to eventually hang in the completed theater.


Beanie Taylor | The News

The ARK

shelter for women and families

www.thearkelkin.org; 336-527-1637

Your Father’s House

men’s shelter

828-781-7125

I Support My Community

Youth-centered 501(c)3

[email protected]; 919-344-6971

Throughout the year members of the Foothills Quilters busy their hands and hearts in order to hold safe the traditions contained in their craft as well as make certain local residents in need keep warm.

Quilts often contain special memories because of the material used hearkening to quilts made from necessity out of whatever scraps of clothing were available.

Several quilts reveal their history and beauty each year during the Yadkin Valley Pumpkin Festival when the guild holds an annual quilt show.

Although these quilts reflect every aspect of local history from the textile industry that made the area famous to the unknown individuals who hand-stitched strips, it is the annual holiday giving that brings the guild the most satisfaction.

“At Christmas time, we present the quilts that we’ve worked on all year long to several organizations for the people that they serve and minister to,” said guild president Andrae Dehaan.

According to guild treasurer Vicki Whelan, this year Foothills Quilters presented regular recipients The ARK of Elkin with 12 quilts, Your Father’s House of Dobson 16 quilts, and 19 blankets for youth-focused organization I Support My Community.

In addition to serving the shelters and sheltering organization, the guild was able to make a donation to an additional project, the Be A Santa To A Senior program.

“We thought we might be able to get at least one and everybody thought that it was a great idea,” said Whelan, “so when it came to what we have left, we have five going to [Home Instead Senior Care of Mount Airy] this year as well.”

In addition to helping declining seniors stay in their home by providing basic assistance with personal and home cleanliness, Home Instead Senior Care has a yearly program to help all area seniors at Christmas time.

“Our first year back in 2011 I think we may have had about 100 seniors that we were able to provide with gifts and now this is our sixth year and we’re up to 424,” said Office Manager Angela Allen of the recent holiday season. “Our hope next year is 500. Our goal every year is more and more.”

Recipients of the Be A Santa To A Senior program are not necessarily Home Instead clients, but also individuals recommended by, “people in the community that have reached out to us to say ‘hey I know someone who would really benefit from this program,’” said Allen, “or people from facilities around town.”

Allen appreciated the opportunity Foothills Quilters gave the Be A Santa To A Senior program to continue giving.

“That senior in need, they may not have family,” said Allen. “Someone that’s not receiving a gift this year. [Giving to them has] been a joy this year. It’s been fun.”

Also joyous at receiving quilts on behalf of guests was Cynthia Cothren, director of The ARK, and Betty Holthouser, vice president of the board.

“We really appreciate all you do for our guests each year,” said Cothren, describing the immediate heirloom the gifts become.

This was echoed by Crystal Best of I Support My Community.

“Some of these kids love their blankets so much they want to get one for another family member,” said Best, who described the emotional warmth included in these gifts.

“A lot of these kids have to share rooms, even beds, and they don’t have anything of their own. These blankets are something of their very own that they can take with them wherever they go,” Best said.

That kind of security is also important to adults such as those at Your Father’s House where a recent addition increased their ability to serve the community as well as their needs.

John Creason, who was once a guest of the house and is now an employee, talked about the importance of receiving his quilt several years previously.

“It reminds you you’re not alone when you are at your worst,” said Creason. “Most of the guys are there because they have hit rock bottom.”

“Thank you guys for the people that you minister to and the work that you do,” said guild president Dehaan. She not only appreciates the work that goes into the quilts, but also the beauty of local barn quilt squares adorning buildings.

“I love seeing the different designs on barns and other buildings when we are traveling,” Dehaan said of the barn art that proclaims the local quilting craft for explorers along many roads throughout the Yadkin Valley including the Yadkin County Quilt Trail.

Traversing lands full of history as well as mesmerizing landscapes, like any good quilt, the sight of these barn quilt squares can lead to lessons about the land and the people who made the community what it is.

“They are a colorful reminder of our heritage and I always love it when I spot one,” said McDowell.

Quilters also love it when they spot their work, such as in the case of a quilt made to help with expenses renovating the recently opened Reeves Theater.

The Reeves quilt project began in 2009 and the finished product was raffled at the Yadkin Valley Pumpkin Festival in 2011.

“I remember being thrilled because four of mine were chosen and I was a new quilter,” Whalen said of the quilt depicting the variety of entertainment expected when the Reeves originally opened.

Some of this tradition continues not only through the newly-renovated theater, but also through the Foothills Quilters who meet on the third Tuesday of each month at the Foothills Arts Council located at 129 Church St. The group meets at 12:45 p.m. for refreshments with a meeting at 1 p.m.

For more information about the Foothills Quilters, email [email protected] or go to foothillsquilters.com.

Beanie Taylor can be reached at 336-258-4058 or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/TBeanieTaylor.

Sharon Bledsoe, Tonya Edwards and Angela Allen of Home Instead of Mount Airy accept five quilts for their Be A Santa For A Senior program.
https://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/web1_25397536_10215407043633561_825060463_o.jpgSharon Bledsoe, Tonya Edwards and Angela Allen of Home Instead of Mount Airy accept five quilts for their Be A Santa For A Senior program. Photo courtesty of Vicki Whelan

The Foothills Quilters gather to present quilts and blankets to representatives form The Ark, Your Father’s House and I Support My Community each holiday season.
https://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/web1_IMG_0018-3-.jpgThe Foothills Quilters gather to present quilts and blankets to representatives form The Ark, Your Father’s House and I Support My Community each holiday season.Beanie Taylor | The News

Four different groups were served with 52 blankets and quilts from the Foothills Quilters.
https://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/web1_IMG_0019-3-.jpgFour different groups were served with 52 blankets and quilts from the Foothills Quilters. Beanie Taylor | The News

John Creason of Your Father’s House, Crystal Best of I Support My Community and The ARK’s Cynthia Cothren and Betty Holthouser accept quilts and blankets from the Foothills Quilters during the holiday season.
https://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/web1_IMG_0023-2-.jpgJohn Creason of Your Father’s House, Crystal Best of I Support My Community and The ARK’s Cynthia Cothren and Betty Holthouser accept quilts and blankets from the Foothills Quilters during the holiday season. Beanie Taylor | The News

Quilts displayed during the Foothills Quilters Quilt Show the fourth Saturday of September exhibit local history in the materials used as well as the people who created them.
https://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/web1_Quilts-1-.jpgQuilts displayed during the Foothills Quilters Quilt Show the fourth Saturday of September exhibit local history in the materials used as well as the people who created them. Beanie Taylor | The News

The Reeves quilt was a special project to help raise money for the rehabilitation of the building and expected to eventually hang in the completed theater.
https://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/web1_ReevesQuilt.jpgThe Reeves quilt was a special project to help raise money for the rehabilitation of the building and expected to eventually hang in the completed theater. Beanie Taylor | The News

By Beanie Taylor

[email protected]

The ARK

shelter for women and families

www.thearkelkin.org; 336-527-1637

Your Father’s House

men’s shelter

828-781-7125

I Support My Community

Youth-centered 501(c)3

[email protected]; 919-344-6971

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