Last updated: February 17. 2014 5:17PM - 941 Views
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Denise Adkins, an employee of Mount Airy News, was happy to receive her bouquet of one dozen roses from her husband, delivered by Creative Designs Flowers and Gifts by 10 a.m. on Friday.
Denise Adkins, an employee of Mount Airy News, was happy to receive her bouquet of one dozen roses from her husband, delivered by Creative Designs Flowers and Gifts by 10 a.m. on Friday.
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The snowfall that blanketed the area put a damper on Valentine’s Day for many in the county.


Although the snow began melting on Friday, as temperatures soared into the 50s, everything was not coming up roses for local florists, who were still feeling the blanketing effect of the snow. Profits that are normally sky high fell flat, with one florist just hoping to come out even in the end.


Valentine’s Day is the most profitable holiday for a florist, with only Mother’s Day close, according to Steve Scott, owner of Airmont Florist.


“We haven’t had any cancellations, but people have been very understanding, offering to come pick their flowers up or let us deliver when we can,” Scott reported. Orders were coming in normally at Airmont, but with the snow placing a thorn in their sides, Scott said they were having “a bit of a nightmare.”


“I had enough foresight, that when they predicted the snow amount, I said to slow it down a little bit and didn’t book as many deliveries as normal.”


Airmont Florist had four delivery people driving vans, but many were finding that businesses were closed and in that case, Scott said they were trying to make arrangements to deliver to homes, or in a worst-case scenario, simply waiting until Monday to deliver to schools and businesses that were closed on Valentine’s Day.


“It will all work out in the end, of course, and we are thankful our customers are being patient,” Scott shared.


Dawn Lawson, owner of Creative Designs Flowers and Gifts, said they had to limit deliveries to areas where they could safely travel, and with many businesses closed, they were also experiencing what she described as a “florist’s nightmare.”


“We did deliver a lot on Tuesday, to people who called and said it was okay, because of the weather predictions. We’ve also had customers stopping by the shop to pick up their arrangements and we are going to try to deliver a lot tomorrow,” Lawson said.


Creative Designs had four vehicles on the road making deliveries yesterday, with several four-wheel drives.


The number one arrangement sold was red roses, Lawson reported — “always has and always will be.”


Mayberry Country Flowers typically sells fresh flowers at Mayberry Mall during the week of Valentine’s Day, as they have been doing regularly since 1985, according to owner Barbara McMillan.


Employee Jean Adams said the mall closing had affected sales, as many regular customers count on stopping by the mall to pick up fresh flowers, including roses, carnations, and mixed arrangements. “We always have a lot of traffic at the mall each year, with a lot of regular customers counting on it,” Adams said.


Mayberry Country Flowers were able to set up at the mall on Wednesday night, but the mall was closed on Thursday and didn’t open until 12 noon yesterday.


Adams said they had two people delivering, and they had made several trips to areas where road conditions were still treacherous, like Pilot Mountain, Pine Ridge, Wards Gap Road, and Dobson. She said that in cases where people were not home, they were leaving a note on the doorknob, for people to call in order to make arrangements for their flowers to be re-delivered or picked up.


“We call and let them know too, and sometimes will call before we go, and hold on to their flowers until they call us…We have been really busy, and we figure it will keep going on until tomorrow. To tell you the truth, it hasn’t hurt us that much, except for the mall, which has put us back about a day and a half.”


For romantics, perhaps the full moon will be some consolation, as it fell on Valentine’s day this year, and according to the Farmer’s Almanac, even without snow February’s full moon is called the Snow Moon.


Reach Jessica Johnson at 719-1933 on Twitter @MountAiryJess.

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