Scenes from Upcoming Garden Tour


By Bill Colvard - bcolvard@MtAiryNews.com



An orchard is planted in the creek bottom between the guest house and stables. The fenced vegetable garden can be seen to the left.


Bill Colvard | The News

Along the brick walkway to the entrance of the house lysimachia, or creeping jenny, has taken root and its limey color is eye-catching. A free standing water feature helps to set the mood under the Akebia covered trellis.


Bill Colvard | The News

At the end of this path is a brick and stone wall fountain designed by the owners. The fountainhead is from New York and is over one hundred years old, sourced from One Way Antiques in King. An in-ground pool is to the right of the fountain. A low stone wall provides seating for a view of the fields, creek and beyond. Cotoneaster bushes line the other side of the pool deck. Pots of Meyer lemon trees and bougainvillea are brought outdoors each summer to enjoy the warm weather. Rose of Sharon is planted behind the wall fountain and is also visible from poolside.


Bill Colvard | The News

Plaques from the National Register of Historic Places and Historic Prservation Foundation of North Carolina grace the 1834 entrance to the historic William Carter house.


Bill Colvard | The News

The garden as seen from the original 1834 front door of the historic William Carter house. Viewed from this direction, the hornbeam allee leads the eye to a sculptural redbud tree, one of the few trees that pre-date the Adams arrival.


Bill Colvard | The News

Stone steps lead from the entrance level down to the guesthouse and stables.


Bill Colvard | The News

Three Mount Airy garden clubs, Garden Gate, Modern Gardeners and Mountain View, are presenting a garden tour on June 10. A recent Mount Airy news feature showcased one of the gardens on the tour, the Historic William Carter House, owned by John and Julie Adams.

Here are some additional photos that were not included in that story.

“Mount Airy Blooms” is June 10 from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. Tickets are $20 and are on sale at Webb Interiors, 1191 W. Lebanon St., Mount Airy, and online at Eventbrite.com.

Though some gardens, including the Adams’ historic William Carter house, are at historic homes, the tour is not a home tour. The gardens will be open but the houses will not be. Restrooms will be available at the comfort station on Main Street and at Cross Creek Country Club.

Proceeds raised from “Mount Airy Blooms” will go to support garden club projects in the area, including the Joan and Howard Woltz Hospice Home Rose Garden, restoration of the gardens at the Historic Moore House, maintenance and upkeep of the Main Street mini-garden fountain, lobby arrangements at Northern Hospital and special programming for the Jones School exceptional children’s class.

An orchard is planted in the creek bottom between the guest house and stables. The fenced vegetable garden can be seen to the left.
http://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/web1_AdamsGarden-10-2.jpgAn orchard is planted in the creek bottom between the guest house and stables. The fenced vegetable garden can be seen to the left. Bill Colvard | The News

Along the brick walkway to the entrance of the house lysimachia, or creeping jenny, has taken root and its limey color is eye-catching. A free standing water feature helps to set the mood under the Akebia covered trellis.
http://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/web1_AdamsGarden-2-2.jpgAlong the brick walkway to the entrance of the house lysimachia, or creeping jenny, has taken root and its limey color is eye-catching. A free standing water feature helps to set the mood under the Akebia covered trellis. Bill Colvard | The News

At the end of this path is a brick and stone wall fountain designed by the owners. The fountainhead is from New York and is over one hundred years old, sourced from One Way Antiques in King. An in-ground pool is to the right of the fountain. A low stone wall provides seating for a view of the fields, creek and beyond. Cotoneaster bushes line the other side of the pool deck. Pots of Meyer lemon trees and bougainvillea are brought outdoors each summer to enjoy the warm weather. Rose of Sharon is planted behind the wall fountain and is also visible from poolside.
http://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/web1_AdamsGarden-5-2.jpgAt the end of this path is a brick and stone wall fountain designed by the owners. The fountainhead is from New York and is over one hundred years old, sourced from One Way Antiques in King. An in-ground pool is to the right of the fountain. A low stone wall provides seating for a view of the fields, creek and beyond. Cotoneaster bushes line the other side of the pool deck. Pots of Meyer lemon trees and bougainvillea are brought outdoors each summer to enjoy the warm weather. Rose of Sharon is planted behind the wall fountain and is also visible from poolside. Bill Colvard | The News

Plaques from the National Register of Historic Places and Historic Prservation Foundation of North Carolina grace the 1834 entrance to the historic William Carter house.
http://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/web1_AdamsGarden-7-2.jpgPlaques from the National Register of Historic Places and Historic Prservation Foundation of North Carolina grace the 1834 entrance to the historic William Carter house. Bill Colvard | The News

The garden as seen from the original 1834 front door of the historic William Carter house. Viewed from this direction, the hornbeam allee leads the eye to a sculptural redbud tree, one of the few trees that pre-date the Adams arrival.
http://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/web1_AdamsGarden-8-2.jpgThe garden as seen from the original 1834 front door of the historic William Carter house. Viewed from this direction, the hornbeam allee leads the eye to a sculptural redbud tree, one of the few trees that pre-date the Adams arrival. Bill Colvard | The News

Stone steps lead from the entrance level down to the guesthouse and stables.
http://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/web1_AdamsGarden-9-2.jpgStone steps lead from the entrance level down to the guesthouse and stables. Bill Colvard | The News

By Bill Colvard

bcolvard@MtAiryNews.com

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