Helping to feed those in need

Last updated: March 11. 2014 2:42PM - 1065 Views
By Lucie R. Willsie lwillsie@civitasmedia.com



Some of the cooks featured in Trinity Episcopal Church's newest cookbook, titled “Trinity Cooks Again,: are: from left, Candace Sammons, past president of the Trinity Episcopal Women's Group, Margie Martin, current president of the Trinity Episcopal Women's Group, Martha Marcum, a member of the Trinity Episcopal Church's Women's Group, Pastor Ray Hannah from Trinity Episcopal Church, Wendy Tatman, past-president of the Trinity Episcopal Women's Group, David Wallace, a member of Trinity Episcopal Church, Mary Lou Roney, a member of the Trinity Episcopal Church's Women's Group, and Mary Fawcett, past president of Trinity Episcopal Church's Women's Group.
Some of the cooks featured in Trinity Episcopal Church's newest cookbook, titled “Trinity Cooks Again,: are: from left, Candace Sammons, past president of the Trinity Episcopal Women's Group, Margie Martin, current president of the Trinity Episcopal Women's Group, Martha Marcum, a member of the Trinity Episcopal Church's Women's Group, Pastor Ray Hannah from Trinity Episcopal Church, Wendy Tatman, past-president of the Trinity Episcopal Women's Group, David Wallace, a member of Trinity Episcopal Church, Mary Lou Roney, a member of the Trinity Episcopal Church's Women's Group, and Mary Fawcett, past president of Trinity Episcopal Church's Women's Group.
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Thanks to the recipes provided by the members of Trinity Episcopal Church in their second cookbook, titled “Trinity Cooks Again,” folks in the area can get the food they need to survive and be healthy, while those purchasing the book can benefit from a variety of recipes from the church’s members.


“We worked on it a good 10 months,” said Mary Fawcett, a past president of Trinity Episcopal Church’s women’s group. This second cookbook from Trinity came out last fall 2013 with up to 20 folks from the church volunteering their time and expertise to making it a reality. The church’s first cookbook came out in 2006 when Fawcett was president of the women’s group. This current cookbook also contains beautiful photos and a blessing at the beginning of each section.


The proceeds from both cookbooks go to supporting the church’s Staples Program. In addition, other area organizations also help provide food and/or funds for the food bank program.


“Staples is an emergency food pantry where folks are eligible to receive food perishables and non-perishables, meat, veggies, fruit, canned food and other stables,” said Ray Hannah, pastor of Trinity Episcopal Church.


Folks can receive roughly four days worth of food.


This program is available from 8:30 to 9:30 p.m., once a month, every Thursday at the church.


“We’ve served more than 1,000 people a year for the last 20 years,” the pastor added.


But the church always is in need of additional donations. In addition to monetary donations, some of the food donations always needed include such items as canned food, fruit, rice, peanut butter and crackers.


“And donations are always appreciated,” the pastor added.


Some of the dishes in the cookbook include: Cheesy Beer Soup; Vichyssoise; Moravian Slaw; Eggplant Caviar; Spicy Oven Fries; Mongolian Beef; Peach-Glazed Pork Tenderloin; Moravian Chicken Pie; Feather Lite Pancakes and Simple Syrup; Garlic Cheese Grits; Blueberry Lemon Cake; Apple Dumplings; Rocky Road Candy; Pepper Jelly; Frank’s Red Hot Buffalo Chicken Dip; Spicy Stuffed Mushrooms; and, of course, the ever popular Elephant Stew, to name just a very few.


There are even a few recipes from some area restaurants, such as the Dairy Center, Pandowdy’s, and the Cross Creek Country Club, in the mix as well. The Dairy Center has provided its Ground Steak Sandwich dish; Pandowdy’s shared its recipe for Apple Pandowdy; and Cross Creek its Brown Sugar Pie.


Some of the cooks who have shared their recipes for this cookbook also have shared some recipe “secrets.”


For example, David Wallace, a member of the church, said his English Pudding recipe called for raisins, but he didn’t have any available. So, cooks can substitute another berry, such as goji.


“My kids couldn’t find anything else at the time,” Wallace said. And it turned out great, he added. Just don’t use a soft berry, such as strawberries, Wallace admonished. That won’t work at all.


Margie Martin, current president of the Trinity Episcopal Women’s Group, made the Hot Virginia Dip. She likes the taste of corned beef best in this recipe.


Wendy Tatman, past president of the Trinity Episcopal Women’s Group, doesn’t use bread crumbs in her Sweet and Sour Meatloaf recipes because her son is allergic to gluten. So, she uses gluten-free oatmeal.


But it must have tasted good, Tatman said, because, out of all of her five children, everybody liked grandma’s meatloaf.


“And, with five kids, that’s saying a lot,” Tatman said.


Candace Sammons, another past president of the church’s women’s group, provided the Roasted Beets recipe.


“I like simple,” she said. “I don’t cook if a recipe has too many ingredients.”


And each and every recipe was taste-tested, she added.


“We only gave recipes we have tried, used and liked,”Sammons said, adding, “Folks are not only getting a good cookbook, but helping the community at the same time.”


Mary Fawcett, another past president of the group, got the Goldfish Bowl Bites recipe she provided from her daughter.


“She found the recipe somewhere about a year ago,” Fawcett said. “We always make it for tailgating … It’s a big hit with everyone.


GOLDFISH BOWL BITES, p. 16


Made by Mary Fawcett, past-president of the Trinity Episcopal Church Women’s Group


Goldfish Bowl Bites recipe by Frances Fawcett Rodenbough


For more information or to purchase the cookbook or to donate food, call: 786-6067, or drop by the church at: 472 N. Main St. in Mount Airy, or check out the church’s website at: www.trinitymtairy.com.


RECIPES


MEXICAN CORNBREAD, p. 195


By Martha Marcum


A member of the Trinity Episcopal Church’s Women’s Group


INGREDIENTS


1 1/2 cups of cornbread mix


2 eggs, beaten


1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes


2 ounces of chopped green chilies


8 ounces of sour cream


1 can of creamed-style corn


1 cup of grated sharp cheddar cheese


DIRECTIONS


Mix together the first six ingredients. Pour half of this batter into a greased baking pan. Sprinkle on the cheese. Then add the rest of the batter. Bake in a 350-degree Fahrenheit oven for 25 to 30 minutes.


SWEET AND SOUR MEATLOAF, p. 122


By Wendy Tatman


Past-president of the Trinity Episcopal Women’s Group


Recipe from Tatman’s grandma Marie Beck


INGREDIENTS


1 8-ounce can of tomato sauce


1/4 cup of apple cider vinegar


1 teaspoon of prepared mustard


1/4 cup of brown sugar


1 teaspoon of Worcestershire sauce


2 pounds of ground beef


1/2 of a sweet onion


1 egg, beaten


1/2 cup of oatmeal


1 teaspoon of salt


1/2 cup of tomato mixture


DIRECTIONS


Combine the first five ingredients in a small bowl and set aside as reserve. Combine the next six ingredients together in a large bowl. Mix it well. (CHEF’S NOTE: It may be easier to mix this using just your hands.) Shape this mixture into a baking dish and top with the first separately made tomato mixture. Bake at 400-degrees Fahrenheit for 45 minutes.


ROASTED BEETS, p. 100


By Candace Sammons


Past-president of the Trinity Episcopal Women’s Group


INGREDIENTS


6 to 8 beets


Olive oil


Dressing


6 to 8 sprigs of fresh thyme


1/4 cup of Balsamic vinegar


3 Tablespoons of orange juice


3 Tablespoons of olive oil


2 drops of vanilla


DIRECTIONS


Preheat the oven to 400-degrees Fahrenheit. Wash the beets well and rub with the olive oil. Wrap each beet tightly with aluminum foil, rubbing the foil onto the beet to insure tightness. Bake for 50 to 60 minutes. Let the beets cool and then carefully remove them from the foil. Slip the peel off of the beets and cut the beets into quarters. Before mixing the dressing, strip the leaves from the fresh thyme, discarding the stems. Mix the last four ingredients of the dressing with the fresh thyme. Adjust the ingredients to suit your taste. Then, when the dressing is prepared, add the dressing to the beets. (CHEF’S NOTE: The beets may be served cold or warmed first in the microwave.)


HOT VIRGINIA DIP, p. 18


Made by Margie Martin, current president of the Trinity Episcopal Women’s Group


Recipe by Wendy Tatman


INGREDIENTS


16 ounces of cream cheese, softened


2 cups of sour cream or plain yogurt


1 teaspoon of garlic salt


1/2 sweet onion, minced


5 ounces of dried beef, or thinly sliced corned beef or pastrami, minced


1 cup of pecans, chopped, and sautéed in 2 Tablespoons of butter


DIRECTIONS


Mix the first five ingredients thoroughly and put the mixture into a 1.5-quart baking dish. Top it with the pecans. Chill until serving time. Bake at 350-degrees Fahrenheit for 20 minutes. Service hot with crackers.


SPINACH CASSEROLE, p. 104


Made by Mary Fawcett


Past president of the Trinity Episcopal Church Women’s Group


Recipe by Erika Rowe-Forbes


INGREDIENTS


2 10-ounce packages of frozen spinach


6 ounces of cream cheese, softened


1/4 pound of butter, melted and seasoned with salt and freshly ground pepper


1/4 cup of bread crumbs (half plain, half seasoned)


3/4 teaspoon of sage


DIRECTIONS


Cook and drain the spinach well. Mix the softened cream cheese with half of the butter and add it to the spinach. Grease a 9-inch Pyrex pie plate or small shallow casserole dish. Pour in the spinach mixture. Add the remaining butter to the bread crumbs and the sage. Spread over the top of the spinach. Bake at 350-degrees for 30 minutes.


GOLDFISH BOWL BITES, p. 16


Made by Mary Fawcett, past president of the Trinity Episcopal Church Women’s Group


Goldfish Bowl Bites recipe by Frances Fawcett Rodenbough


INGREDIENTS


2 6-ounce bags of plain Goldfish crackers


1 6-ounce bag of cheddar Goldfish crackers


1 6-ounce bag of pretzel Goldfish crackers


1 cup of pecan halves (CHEF’S NOTE: This amount can be doubled, according to taste.)


1/2 cup of butter or margarine, melted


1 teaspoon of Worcestershire sauce


4 Tablespoons of ranch salad dressing mix


DIRECTIONS


Preheat the oven to 250-degrees Fahrenheit. Combine the crackers and the pecans in a large, shallow roasting pan. Combine the melted butter, Worcestershire sauce and ranch dressing mix. Pour this mixture over the crackers and gently stir to coat. Now bake for 60 minutes, stirring every 15 minutes. Once evenly toasted, remove this dish from the oven. Allow to cool completely before serving, however. (CHEF’S NOTE: Any combination of Goldfish crackers will do, according to taste. Just make sure you use at least four 6-ounce bags.)


CHOCOLATE CHIP CREAM CHEESECAKE, p. 212


By Mary Lou Roney, a member of the Trinity Episcopal Church’s Women’s Group


INGREDIENTS


2 8-ounce packages of cream cheese


2/3 cup of sugar


2 eggs


12-ounce package of chocolate chips


3 cups of flour


2 cups of sugar


1/2 cup of baking cocoa


2 teaspoons of baking soda


2/3 cup of Crisco oil


2 cups of water


2 teaspoons of vanilla


2 Tablespoons of vinegar


DIRECTIONS


Mix the first three ingredients together well until smooth. Then stir in the chocolate chips. Set this mixture aside. First, mix together the next four ingredients. Then add the following four ingredients to this mixture. Beat until blended. Pour into a 16-inch-by-11-inch pan that is greased and floured. Using a tablespoon, drop the cheese mixture on top, here and there. Bake about 1 hour at 350-degrees Fahrenheit.


TRADITIONAL ENGLISH SPOTTED-DICK (OR BOILED SUET PUDDING WITH BITS OF DRIED FRUIT), p. 258


By David Wallace, a member of Trinity Episcopal Church


INGREDIENTS


1/2 cup of raisins


1/4 cup of currants


1/3 cup of dark brown sugar


The grated zest of 1 unwaxed lemon


1 cup of self-rising flour, plus some extra for dusting


1/2 cup of shredded suet


A pinch of salt


1/4 cup of milk


Custard


DIRECTIONS


Mix together the flour, sugar, salt, suet, currants and raisins. Keep mixing while adding a little water at a time until the entire mixture becomes a firm dough. Roll this dough into a long, cylindrical shape that is about 8 inches long. Now, take a clean, dry pudding cloth (like a large linen dish towel), dusted with flour, and then wrap it around the dough cylinder. Tie off each end of the cloth, but take care to leave a little room between the ends of the dough cylinder and the cloth to allow for expansion when steaming. Put the wrapped dough into a steamer over a large pan of boiling water. Stem for about 2 hours. Make sure to keep filling the pan of boiling water with more water so it doesn’t boil dry. Serve with an abundance of custard.


PEPPERS AND SAUSAGES (PHILADELPHIA-STYLE), p. 131


Made by Pastor Ray Hannah


From Trinity Episcopal Church


Recipe by The Rev. Ray Hanna


INGREDIENTS


6 large Italian sausages, to taste (mild, sweet, hot, spicy or a mixture)


Olive oil


1 green pepper


1 red pepper


1 onion


4 cloves of garlic, crushed


1 large can of whole plum tomatoes


1 small can of tomato paste


Salt and pepper to taste


Hot pepper flakes, if desired


DIRECTIONS


Cut the onion, green peppers, and red peppers into slices. Sauté them in the olive oil until limp. Next, stir in the crushed garlic, salt and pepper. Remove this mixture from the pan. Next, cut the sausage into 1-inch pieces and brown it in the same pan in which the onions and peppers were sautéed. Also, add the plum tomatoes and the tomato paste to this pan. Stir. Add enough water to thin the mixture. Cover and bake for at least 2 hours, with the last half hour being uncovered. Serve with spaghetti noodles or bread. Preheat the oven to 350-degrees Fahrenheit.


Lucie R. Willsie may be reached at 336-719-1930 or on Twitter @LucieRWillsie.


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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