Last updated: March 29. 2014 3:49PM - 992 Views
By - dbroyles@civitasmedia.com



Student Geoffrey Walker stands in front of some ceramic figures he created to represent characters in a computer game he is creating. Walker holds a sketch of one of the characters before it was later translated from a one dimensional image to a three dimensional figure.
Student Geoffrey Walker stands in front of some ceramic figures he created to represent characters in a computer game he is creating. Walker holds a sketch of one of the characters before it was later translated from a one dimensional image to a three dimensional figure.
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DOBSON — Surry Community’s Spring 2014 Student Art Show offered students a Chance to showcase their work, and an opportunity for their families to get a glimpse of what the students have been doing in school.


encompassed the 50th anniversary of the school’s academic family.


“I love seeing the families come through,” said Arts and Humanities Division Chairperson DanaJean Mabry ” There’s the younger children (siblings) and the grandparents. Sometimes, many of them haven’t ever been to an art exhibit before. They experience something their child has created on display for the world to see. It gives them a sense of ownership. They can say ‘that’s my child.’”


Mabry explained the college’s associate of arts program is designed to make its students experiment in a variety of mediums before they move on to a four-year university and eventually specialize. An example of creativity spanning two different mediums is the work of SCC Student Geoffrey Walker, who is combining an original digital computer game with two dimensional art and three dimensional ceramics.


“These figures I have made are based off of a computer game I am creating,” said Walker. “I wanted to put them in another form other than paper.” He said his short term goal was to sculpt half of the characters in his game and he bases them on elements he has seen in the real world like cartoons, (Japanese) Anime, friends, relatives and even on other games.


He said one component of his computer game is trying to give his characters a voice or at least have the dialog in sync so it appears to come naturally from the characters. Walker said many gamers like to hear dialog rather than read. He said he has 46 characters and hopes to have 200 characters in the game. Walker said his love of drawing started in kindergarten because he like to draw and found it fun.


Walker said his process of creation of characters often are suggested by some of the mechanics of the game’s story falling into place rather than have a completed story to work backwards from to justify a character.


“Sometimes I discover something I can do (digitally) and alter the game around it,” Walker said. “There are times I have to make up one character to do something, like a mission, in the game and this can affect other characters. One character I created adds a whodunit to the game.”


Student Kasey Bowman talked with a classmate about a ceramic dragon mask and some bowls she had on display.


“I am so pleased with the way the (pottery) glazes turned out,” said Bowman. ” I was surprised how well the colors turned out and it was exciting to see what happened. Going into firing, one color looked like a Pepto Bismal pink which wasn’t good. I have finished two large bowls and two plates and we’re moving on to tea pots.”


She explained she began taking the classes as an elective and this is her second semester taking ceramics. Bowman said she wants to transfer to Appalachian State in Language Arts and Science Education.


“The thing about throwing pottery is if there’s a bad day you can work things out. The throwing is meditation,” said Bowman. “There are times I have been the studio working and I look up and it’s been four hours and I realize I need to go home.”


Lead Instructor for Advertising/Graphics Design Jay Smith said the show had one of its stronger turnouts than previous years and said the students appeared to enjoy their works’ public debuts.


David Broyles may be reached at 336-325-1952 or on twitter@MtAiryNewsDave.


 
 
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