Pinnacle bazaar continues long tradition


By Dean Palmer - Special to the News



PINNACLE — There are yard sales, flea markets and church bazaars, and then there are Big Time church bazaars.

With more then two decades of annual sales, Pinnacle’s Mount Zion United Methodist Church falls in that latter category as it continues a community tradition Saturday with its annual fall church bazaar.

The bazaar will begin at 8 a.m. with a breakfast of ham and sausage biscuits being served in the church fellowship hall.

A “general store” will be set up, offering a variety of canned goods along with jellies, jams and home-baked goods such as breads, pies, cakes and cookies.

A craft section will feature the handiwork of church members, with many providing their own specialty items each year. Regular offerings have included a wide variety of such items as pot holders, pottery, jewelry, knitted items, Christmas and Halloween decorations and woodworking of all types, with many painted by hand.

“We’ve had four ladies working on putting this together all summer long,” noted John Starbuck, one of the day’s primary organizers. “And our whole church gets involved in the day.”

An abundance of preparation also goes into a silent auction, with bids accepted on an assortment of mostly handmade items throughout the morning. Items are awarded near the 1 p.m. end of the event with winners not required to be present.

“Our people put some time into this and we always have some nice homemade stuff,” Starbuck said.

An outdoor yard sale will take place under the picnic shelter, featuring a wide assortment of donated items.

Each year since the bazaar’s beginning, a highlight has been the drawing for a handmade quilt. Polly Jones, a beloved member of the church who was known for her crafting had made the quilts until her passing in 2015, always put together a quilt for the event.

While this will be the first year that a Polly Jones quilt has not been available, the tradition will continue with a queen-size quilt made by Melony Moser of King being offered. Tickets for this year’s quilt will be available for a $1 donation throughout the morning with the quilt to be awarded near the end of the event.

Over the years, the annual gathering has developed a loyal local following. Visitors from throughout northwestern North Carolina have become reliable patrons thanks to the simultaneous scheduling of Horne Creek Living Historical Farm’s popular Cornshucking Frolic (10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday).

Visitors from Surry, Stokes, Forsyth, and Guilford counties and beyond stream by the church, located at 1989 Perch Road, with many regularly stopping on their way to Horne Creek. The church is located one mile from the Pinnacle exit of U.S. 52.

“We’ve developed a good reputation and we always seem to have a good turnout,” Starbuck noted. “Our whole community looks forward to this and is good to support it. A lot of people will come by for breakfast and to look around, then they’ll come back later to shop, get in on the quilt drawing and have lunch with us.

According to Starbuck, proceeds from the day will help fund the church’s community projects for the coming year, including mission projects and helping those with need in the local area.

”Our entire church participates in the planning and getting ready for this,” Starbuck said. “We all look forward to this day and we all enjoy seeing everybody.”

By Dean Palmer

Special to the News

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