County schools publish annual report


By Jeff Linville - jlinville@s24476.p831.sites.pressdns.com



East Surry seniors walk off the field after receiving their diplomas last summer. East Surry had a 93-percent graduation rate last year, and Surry County Schools as a whole was at 90 percent.


Jeff Linville | The News

Elementary students dress in patriotic colors for Memorial Day last May.


Submitted photo

Brenden Pack, a seventh-grader at Central Middle, takes first place in the middle-school painting category with “Sea Turtle” in April’s Surry County Schools art show.


Jeff Linville | The News

Teacher Gail Shelton poses with the Baby-Think-It-Over infant simulator. After 36 years at North Surry, Shelton retired last summer.


Jeff Linville | The News

DOBSON — Surry County Schools has published a 12-page booklet for its annual report under the theme of “One Voice.”

The report summarizes the state of the school district at the end of the 2015-16 school year. Among the accomplishments noted is a new record for graduation rate and being ranked 15th out of 115 school systems across the state.

“Throughout the history of the Surry County Schools system, we have worked with one voice … and it has all been done in harmony for the students,” said Dr. Travis Reeves, SCS superintendent.

While talking about one united voice, the district also notes the growing diversity of its student base. For its 8,442 students, 72 percent were Caucasian, 23 percent Hispanic, 2.3 percent African American and 2.1 percent multiracial.

• For academic achievements, the school system had three end-of-grade subject areas ranked in the top 10 for the state: second in fourth-grade math, seventh in fourth-grade reading and fourth in sixth-grade math. Four other subject areas ranked between 13th and 15th.

• Last June, 527 students graduated from the three traditional high schools and 81 from the Surry Early College.

For East Surry, North Surry and Surry Central, 79 percent of seniors said they planned to continue their education. Two-thirds of those students said they would go to a community college, while the other third are enrolling at a four-year school.

Those at the early college have already been earning college credits, so there is a lower rate of students looking to attend a two-year school after graduation. About 20 percent of the graduates are attending a community college, but half of the 81 graduates said they were enrolling in a four-year school.

Graduates from the three high schools have accepted 154 scholarships totaling $8.28 million. The early college students received 13 scholarships for $395,939.

• The Surry Virtual Academy grew to offer 23 online courses for high school students.

Over those courses, students signed up for 500 classes and completed 364, a rate of 87.7 percent successful.

Between the virtual academy and the early college, high school students earned 3,109 college credits during the school year.

• In sports, the high schools compete in two different conferences. East Surry is in the Northwest 1A Conference, while Surry Central and North Surry are in the Western Piedmont 2A Conference.

Between the three schools, sports teams brought conference titles in 10 sports.

Some of those championships came as no surprise like North Surry’s volleyball and wrestling and Surry Central’s girls tennis team keeping their streaks going, while others were a pleasant surprise like North’s return to power in boys basketball and Surry Central’s first-ever girls golf title.

Other conference champs were East Surry football and girls swimming, North’s girls basketball and cross country, and Central’s boys soccer.

• For those 8,400 students, the nutrition departments provided 704,092 breakfasts and 1.16 million lunches. All 11 elementary schools and Meadowview Magnet Middle School offer universal free breakfast. Nearly two-thirds of students receive free or reduced lunch prices.

The cafeterias had an inspection average of 98.5 percent.

• The bus system included 115 student buses and 22 activity buses. They traveled 7,200 miles a day to transport 5,135 kids. All the buses have GPS tracking and a little more than half have on-board cameras.

• The district is the largest employer in the county with more than 1,200 workers.

The operating budget was $67.5 million for the year. Three-fourths of that comes from the state, 7 percent from the federal government and 14 percent from the local level.

East Surry seniors walk off the field after receiving their diplomas last summer. East Surry had a 93-percent graduation rate last year, and Surry County Schools as a whole was at 90 percent.
http://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/web1_0JAL3559_filtered.jpgEast Surry seniors walk off the field after receiving their diplomas last summer. East Surry had a 93-percent graduation rate last year, and Surry County Schools as a whole was at 90 percent. Jeff Linville | The News

Elementary students dress in patriotic colors for Memorial Day last May.
http://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/web1_MD11.jpgElementary students dress in patriotic colors for Memorial Day last May. Submitted photo

Brenden Pack, a seventh-grader at Central Middle, takes first place in the middle-school painting category with “Sea Turtle” in April’s Surry County Schools art show.
http://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/web1_Sea-Turtle.jpgBrenden Pack, a seventh-grader at Central Middle, takes first place in the middle-school painting category with “Sea Turtle” in April’s Surry County Schools art show. Jeff Linville | The News

Teacher Gail Shelton poses with the Baby-Think-It-Over infant simulator. After 36 years at North Surry, Shelton retired last summer.
http://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/web1_0JAL3631_filtered.jpgTeacher Gail Shelton poses with the Baby-Think-It-Over infant simulator. After 36 years at North Surry, Shelton retired last summer. Jeff Linville | The News

By Jeff Linville

jlinville@s24476.p831.sites.pressdns.com

Reach Jeff at 415-4692.

Reach Jeff at 415-4692.

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