Colman to share history, technique of soap making


By Dean Palmer - Special to The News



Mary Colman of Pinnacle Hills Goat Farm focuses on her work during a soap making demonstration held last spring at Horne Creek Living Historical Farm.


Soap maker Mary Colman of Pinnacle Hills Goat Farm talks to workshop participants during a soap making demonstration held last March at Horne Creek Living Historical Farm.


PINNACLE — Horne Creek Living Historical Farm will host a soap making workshop on Thursday evening from 6-7:30 at the visitor center.

Mary Colman of the nearby Pinnacle Hills Goat Farm will demonstrate her soap making technique, using lavender-infused oil and calendula-infused oil, along with corn meal for exfoliation.

“We’re going to be making an easy garden soap that’s good for beginners and ideal for clean-up after working in the garden,” Colman noted.

As she works, Colman says, she will take time to explain the entire soap making process as well as sharing soap making history.

Colman will explain the use of lye in soap making, while sharing precautions of working with lye and using knowledge to “take the fear away.”

“We’ll learn about pouring it into a mold, cutting and curing it,” she described. “It’s really not that hard. Those who are interested can find the ingredients locally and begin making their own soap.”

While soap making has grown as a business for Colman, it is her goat farm that is a passion.

The farm is home to Nigerian Dwarf and Lamancha dairy goats. She is in the process of transitioning from Nigerian Dwarf to Lamancha because of the latter breed’s more abundant milk production. In addition to providing the milk for her business, the goats are a source of fond enjoyment for Colman.

Colman started making her own soap nine years ago, using the goat milk, and has used the business to help with funds for the goat farm. She had started experimenting with making goat milk soaps and other varieties as a means of seeking relief from her own skin issues, including “itchiness.” She had heard about the health benefits of goat milk soap and was immediately pleased with the her own results.

She attributes much of her local success to being able to offer her products at local farmer’s markets. Area residents may also find Colman’s soaps at Blue Mountain Herbs and Supplements, located on Main Street, as well as other area stores. And a full line of her offerings can be seen at www.pinnaclehillsgoatfarm.com.

Colman’s diverse line of goat milk soaps and other natural products includes some 45 varieties of scented and unscented soaps, almost all of which are made with goat milk.

Cost for the workshop is $26.76 and advance registration is required. Seating is limited and all participants must be at least 16 years of age. For more information or registration, Horne Creek Farm can be reached at 325-2298.

Dean Palmer may be reached at 336-351-4131 or dean.palmer8@gmail.com.

Mary Colman of Pinnacle Hills Goat Farm focuses on her work during a soap making demonstration held last spring at Horne Creek Living Historical Farm.
http://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/web1_DSC03077.jpgMary Colman of Pinnacle Hills Goat Farm focuses on her work during a soap making demonstration held last spring at Horne Creek Living Historical Farm.

Soap maker Mary Colman of Pinnacle Hills Goat Farm talks to workshop participants during a soap making demonstration held last March at Horne Creek Living Historical Farm.
http://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/web1_DSC03084-1-.jpgSoap maker Mary Colman of Pinnacle Hills Goat Farm talks to workshop participants during a soap making demonstration held last March at Horne Creek Living Historical Farm.

By Dean Palmer

Special to The News

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